This Light Girl’s Take On Light Girls

I’ve suffered, oh how I have suffered this past year with writers block and a multitude of other excuses NOT to write until last night. After watching Light Girls on OWN I’m now bum-rushed with a multitude of self-centered attitudes and opinions that I think everyone ought to read about…

My intention was to watch this piece with a an open heart and mind. I wanted to allow myself to step beyond my own experience and see if this dialogue would serve as a haven for yellow girls who may not have ever felt like anyone related to their experience. I had hoped that this would be an opportunity to walk away from the message with an enlightened frame of mind or a broader scope of opinion. I believe I was failed in my expectation. Although the discussion had major potential as an instrument of societal education, it ended up being a divisive mess.

Without re-hatching the entire documentary, here’s where I believe the show could have been powerful.

It seemed to me that the participants were encouraged to reveal their negative experiences as light skinned women in a tit-for-tat match in comparison to the oppression and rejection that dark skinned women typically face. At least, it was edited to to depict that. I think that if they had narrowed the narrative and spent more time focusing on the real ways in which our experience as light skinned women differs from those of our deeply melanated sistren, we would have actually gotten somewhere.

Showcasing real-life-fly-on-the-wall experiences of how being light skinned can make us privy to places and permit exposure to experiences that our counterparts are often refused or outright shunned. Examples from these women of how growing up in a world so deeply divided by shadism has effected the way in which we must tread through society. I’ve recently been in a position to have to explain to a client that yes, I am Black and no, I’d rather not “pass” as something else even though I can get away with it; This “conversation” occurred in a boardroom. To me, I see situations such as these as sad abuses of my identity and to express these experiences lends voice to the fact that mal-acceptance and rejection happens to practically all non-white people at onetime or another.

I wish they had talked about understanding the power of our visibility because that’s what “light skinned privilege” really boils down to doesn’t it? Being a woman and being visible.
Being approved of to be heard and seen and loved. Having your right to exist validated because of the shade of your complexion. “Passers” understood this years ago and it’s quantified in the mainstream media today.

They could have discussed the heart-felt obligation which drives some of us to over-compensate our “Blackness” by being uber vigilant and outspoken on social issues which plague the Black community, many of which do not impact our own social lives directly. The need to be apologetic for being born a shade apart from our own people.

Instead of flagrantly and distastefully daring to insinuate violence and sexual assault as things that only light skinned women experience, they could have shed light on some of the things that set light skinned and bi/multi racial women on different courses of social development from early stages in life.

Other than a few key elements, I enjoyed hearing from Angela Davis, Soledad O’Brien, Amber-Rose and Iyanla) this film lacked a cohesive dialog which eventually lead somewhere. The commentary included far too many men and women who aren’t even light skinned to begin with. In other words it was empty. 
Although this movie had the potential to unite WOC, I fear it may have further fragmented our already fragile unity as kindred.  In order for a film like this to work, it would have to be met with some serious empathy and I just don’t think it was presented in the right package.

I will say that the one positive I took from this documentary is the outright refusal to apologize for who I am, my genetic makeup, my experiences in this life as a human being or denounce myself out of the cultural diaspora for not being considered Black enough.
If anything, it further reinforced my desire to pay closer attention to each and every break I am given in this world and use it to make a way for someone else. Not because I’m anyone’s hero but more because, what’s the point of having privilege or power if one doesn’t A) Recognize it and B) Utilize it.
How to do all of this is where the challenge lies… Any feedback is welcomed. Unpacking and deconstructing this reality is a most fragile and difficult thing to do.

These are simply my opinions.

~R

Light Reflected Is Enlightenment Infinite

4 Comments

Filed under Education

Freedom has no space for victim-hood. Let’s get FREE.

Freedom has no space for victim-hood. Let’s get FREE..

Leave a comment

Filed under African Canadian, Black Canadian, Black Educators, Black Youth, Musings, Racism

#SolidarityIsForBlackWomenToo

Ankh

*I write this in response to a creeping Kola Boofs Twitter timeline and seeing a back-and-forth between she and Rosanne*

The women reading this Blog are gainfully employed, running functioning households, controlling successful businesses, busy being beautiful, whatever; So, I’ll TRY to keep this short and sweet 😉

Tommy Sotomayor IS sending a message which although particularly controversial, is one that some people feel is a motivating force within the Black Community. Many people understand the use of his platform to simply be a self-reflective mirror showing that we ought to be holding ourselves to higher standards of morality and ethics; A necessary evil of sorts.
Others at the polar opposite of the spectrum instead believe that he is a contagion; A deadly strain of ideological virus compiled of hatred and contempt toward Black Women in general and that he is set on propagating the lie that we are on a path of self-destruction. That we are ugly, matriarchal failures. Genocidal maniacs.

I’ve watched my fair share of TS YouTube clips and am familiar with the jargon of “Beasties”, “Snow Queens”, “Mixed Nuts” and “Hair Hatted Hooligans”. I’ve also become fluent to the language of “Simps” and “Madden Kings” and so, I well understand the “message of his media” and where both sides have formed their opinions from. Tommy Sotomayor openly and scathingly critiques Black Women and Black Men however, like him or hate him; His types have become an important enigma in the world of North American internet savvy Black People. Tommy Sotomayor and the like are speaking about us and therefore they are speaking to us. But ultimately, it is our prerogative to acknowledge, discuss, ignore or silence their condescension. That us being Black People however; These messages are far reaching and unfortunately not only falling into our ears, so instead of hitting home only within the realm of our particular communities, it’s breaching cultural “boundaries”.
I believe that the judgment that some white people are allowing themselves to openly express toward Black Women is a side-effect after also being exposed to TS type messages; Collateral damage so to speak. (As if having the loaded finger of detriment pointed at us isn’t enough.) You want to judge us? Fine, it’s your right but, I suggest you sit quietly by and in blood curdling suffocating silence.
Stop assuming that the world needs you to speak for it because you can’t and yes, you assume the implication right; It is simply because you are white and inexperienced with what it means to be considered “other”. As much as it’s your right to direct your misinformed judgement toward us, we’ve every right to call you out on it and demand that you miss us with your foolishness. When we catch you in blatant acts of prejudice and discrimination, it’s not a reflection of our inherent “angry”ness to reject your violation, it’s simple self preservation of which we are also entitled to. It forces to mistrust you and therefore sometimes refrain from truly connecting with you. I digress…

Though, I don’t presume to speak for all Black Women, I think it’s safe to illuminate the sacred sorority that does exist between us.
We are all our mothers daughters but we are her first born and therefore delightfully special and beautifully unique. I choose not to pretend to understand a hierarchy where you feel you deserve to be placed above us, undermining our right to exist within the norms, mores, taboos and boundaries of our own cultures. Undermine our own agency to navigate the complexities of our relationships. Undermine the acceptance, indifference or the critiques of our own men. Men who may not love us but of who we are by nature innately designed and bound to love in spite of ourselves. (A WHOLE other essay entirely…)
Understand that we do not consider you to be beneath us; For our Mothers taught us to be especially respectful of other Women but, if you continue to chose to NOT be beside us within our framework of true and inclusive sorority which protects the integrity of Women as a whole and does not cheapen the right to exist of certain individuals, then inevitably, you will subjugate yourselves invariably.
Contrary to your popular opinion, we do not need you in order to be relevant. We are not in juxtaposition with you. We do not worship you. We can and do reject your assumption of dominion over us.
White supremacist Euro-Judeo-Anglo Saxon superiority is an utter fallacy and if you refuse to see us as equals, as fellow She-People; We will refuse to see you at all. We have each other, the majority of us do not take it for granted. Intersectionality is simply a theory, a theory that can be bitterly rejected.

P.S. Some of You will deconstruct this and claim that I am defending Ts; Resoundingly, NO I am not. I’m saying that we are mindful enough to deal with the fallout of his ideologies on our own and are also intelligent enough to see through a White persons “co-sign” on his perception of us. We see that your support of people like that is simply you giving your-less-than-perfect-self permission to stereotype and paint all Black Women with the broad stroke of ratchetness without a) Knowing more than maybe two Black Women and likely not that intimately and b) Understanding ANY thing about us. So, unless you’re defending the right of all Women to exist, be silent.
Black Women can support and hold each other up magnificently therefore, where there are changes and areas for growth within our circles, we can help to positively influence each other and we do. We have each other to help Mother and Sister each other to self-improvement, striving to becoming better individuals so that we can be better Daughters, Sisters, Mothers, Wives, Lovers and Friends. Solidarity is nothing short of love.
TS is welcome to his opinion, but as we all know by now, opinions are like assh*les; Everyone has one and some are shi*tty 😉

The moral of the story is; Always think twice before You openly climb aboard some bandwagon full of bull sh*t because we can see through misogynistic f*ckey just as well as the next Lass.

Light Reflected is enlightenment infinite.
~R

2 Comments

Filed under African Canadian, Black Canadian, Black Educators, Black Literature, Education, Eurocentricism, Literacy, Musings, Parents, Racism, Uncategorized, Women

The Universe Smiled.

Avas New Feet

Sweet Mahogany Brown
Baby Girl
Tantamount to all that is life
Testimony that all is right
With the world
and My heart
Because You breath
You sneeze
You feel, touch, taste and sound
Delicious
Precious to all of Us
Who
Hopeful and healing
We waited on
You
We prayed for You
And. You. Did. Come.
Not as the light to fill
All darknesses
but a light to be
Her very own beacon
of uncomplicated perfection
On this your born day,
We honor the grace of Your
presence.
Today, tomorrow to always
Dear Child
Yes, Alive. You. Came.
Blinking and breathing
Strongest heart of small hearts
Beating tangible life into the world
And the Universe
Smiled.

Rachelle M. Turple
Jan.20/14 9:30am

Inspired by my beautiful niece Ava born this day at 6:28am
Love You Forever & Always & Forever Again…
~Antie

5 Comments

Filed under Poetry

12 Years A Slave: An essay, a review.

12 Years

I purposely waited until saw McQueen’s 12 Years A Slave twice before writing an essay in dedication to the thought this film is responsible for provoking. I wanted to ensure that I hadn’t been beguiled by the beauty of the Louisiana setting, the intriguing melancholic score or the creative nuances that make this film easily one of the best cinematic experiences I’ve ever had.

Having said all of that, anyone who’s seen the film will agree or flounder trying to argue that the transfer of Northup’s horrifying experiences within the physical and spiritual confines of slavery from print to film wasn’t an industry clinic in screenplay and film adaptation.

But enough movie love, now for a healthy dose of relativity. As much as I love this film, I loved the fact that it was even made more. This story needed to be told on film. In all my years of thinking I was well versed in what slavery was, I never seriously extended my curiosity toward the exploration of the inhumane reality that “free” Black people were sold into slavery right on North American soil. To further illustrate; Often when we think in terms of slavery, we tend to romanticize that Black People were only kidnapped, stolen and whisked away from the shores of Africa. I was ignorant in not considering how often “free” Black People were kidnapped, stolen and whisked away from the shores of the Atlantic, renamed and sold into slavery right here in North America.

In a way that Roots, Amistad, Beloved, The Color Purple, Glory, Imitation Of Life, A Raisin In The Sun, Queen and other film depictions of Black People surviving in a disordered world at the end of the white man’s whip and under the white man’s arbitrary control, 12 Years A Slave surpasses it’s cinematographic peers. I liken it to The Passion Of The Christ in the sense that, although we have the biblical and apostolic recount of Jesus’ tortured last days on Earth; Until Mel Gibson unabashedly displayed his torture on film, for me, it was merely a story.
Slavery is not a story. It is a poignant, relevant and historical reality as was the violence, torture and degradation. As is the social psychopathy that has thus evolved because of it. For me, this movie epitomizes living in “niggery” and is a point blank example of why I believe that no Black Person should use or condone the use of the *N* word and especially by other Black People. There is an abomination of power within that word and it is loaded with venom that has been used to dehumanize us from the dawn of the North Atlantic slave trade up to this very second in time.

Like many of you, I can recall the annual Roots marathon during Black history month and being expected to re-watch it year after year. My parents knew that it was important for me to see the human travesty that was slavery and that reading about it simply wasn’t enough. This is also why I insisted my teens watch this film. It wasn’t just that I wanted them to see a contemporary take on our history as North American Black People, I need them to understand that if there was ever a time to be a Black Person living in North America, it’s now. There is simply no excuse for average or sub par effort when they do not face the constraints our ancestors had to and who did not give up and accept the status quo and merely exist; They endured in the hope that one day their generations would live.
I remember my father being angered by the scenes in Roots and his explosions of emotion when he felt the anguish and helplessness of Kunta Kinte. Even into his mid 70’s, Daddy claims he’d rather have died trying to free himself of bondage by inflicting violence on anyone in his path rather than accept life as a slave. I’ve seen this movie in theaters twice now and both times, I kept wishing for Django to ride up and kill every oppressor in his path.

As a demonstrative period piece, this story allows for no heroes and makes no false pretenses about who people were in relation to the social hierarchy in this time. The white women in this film felt no disregard toward owning, degrading and brutalizing people and even encouraged it while, rare white people, who were intrinsically abhorred by slavery still referred to Black People as “niggers”. A reminder that language is ultra powerful when objectifying humans. I walked away feeling like the majority of white people in this time were absolutely terrifying because they were absolutely crazy.
The violence inflicted on human beings at the hands of other human beings is unfathomable and yet, I understand that in order for slavery to have been sustained, immeasurable violence, abuse, neglect and brainwash had to exist and the people carrying out this violence had obvious mental issues, although lucid enough to utilize the bible as a tool of obedience to assert power over others; It takes a disconnected and sick individual to not see a fellow human as a fellow human and deduce that they worth only the value that they serve as commodities.

In terms of history and violence as it relates to enslaving and violating human beings, we often neglect to validate herstory. Without giving any of the story away, Patsy is absolute misery personified. Patsy reminds us that Black Women existed for three reasons: To labor, bear commodities and satisfy the lust and desires of their controllers. The list of desires is open ended. Patsy is the reason I will never classify myself as a feminist for I believe the disdain, superiority, ignorance, insecurity and hatred portrayed by the white women in this film was an accurate depiction. It was was alive and kicking during the suffragette movement and the contemporary feminist movement is rife with discord now. I’m a womanist and my heart aches for Patsy who couldn’t be protected by men who had also been dehumanized and made powerless to protect themselves let alone others by the very same men who victimized her. There are no heroes in this movie. The actions of every character are motivated simply by social status, lack of choice and survival. At times, the imagery in 12 Years A Slave depicting this powerlessness is enough to make you vomit.

Overall, I think this movie is an important film and that it is a “must see” for a variety of reasons. As a period piece, Spielberg’s award winning Lincoln, which I actually found quite boring, pales in comparison. Canada’s own Lawrence Hill’s, The Book Of Negroes is being adapted to film and is set to release in 2014. Now this is a story I can’t wait to see on screen. Although the story is fictitious, it’s set to the degrading reality which is our history rooted in slavery and I am excited to see the heroine Aminata come to life and leap from the page. To watch Her evolve from a curious and sheltered child stolen African child to an intelligent, brave and industrious grown African Woman living within and beyond slavery in North America will be worthwhile.

Isn’t that what we’re all really doing anyway; Trying to live beyond slavery? There is no “post racial” era and Jim Crow hasn’t up and died. North America is still very much polarized in terms Black and White and, structural, intentional and institutionalized racism is typical. Are we really so far removed from the plight of our grandparents? Are we really so far removed from Solomon who probably never thought that as a “free” Black Man living in the North, he’d be sold into slavery; Like the Black Man whose rights and freedoms are infringed upon with racial profiling or, locked up for driving while Black with no access to decent legal representation? The Black Men and Women who’re handcuffed, arrested and humiliated for innocently shopping at Macy’s. Both the book and film are the recount of a fascinating and thought provoking experience but, now that we’re thinking and talking about it, what are we to do with the insight?

Light reflected is enlightenment infinite.

~Rachelle

4 Comments

Filed under Black Canadian, Black Educators, Black Literature, Education, Literacy, Musings, Racism, Uncategorized, Women

From Mis-education to Self-education: Taking Responsibility for our Mental Freedom

A personal dialogue on the importance of self-awareness and on who the overall onus of educating our children lies with.

“Currently, it is the schools that are majorly responsible for socializing, instilling values, moralizing and instructing Black learners. I believe that in handing near total control over to the education system, we are allowing for the systematic annihilation of our intellectual and therefore future potential. We are inviting people whose best interests it is to keep us ignorant, docile and complacent to have control and dominance over our minds. We are permitting our children to be systematically and purposefully prepared to be “larger” society’s worker ants.

Why do we do this? Because during the civil rights movements we naively and ignorantly fought to assimilate our education along with those who did not want us on their school property let alone in their classrooms. Those who never intended “formal” education be extended to us and furthermore, we put the control of our “mind building” into the hands of people who did…

View original post 592 more words

1 Comment

Filed under Education

Eurocentric Brainwash: WE simply don’t need YOUr sensitivity.

Eurocentric Brainwash: WE simply don't need YOUr sensitivity..

1 Comment

Filed under African Canadian, Black Canadian, Education, Eurocentricism, Musings, Racism, Women

Eurocentric Brainwash: WE simply don’t need YOUr sensitivity.

Piggybacking on my recent article “Eurocentric Brainwash: The Bain Of Black Existence In North America” I want to extend further thought on this topic.
Recently a feminist blogger, who shall remain nameless, published a critique on a chart topping pop song and displayed much angst about the supposed critical analysis of over indulgent Hip Hop and stereotypical Black High society.
Why has this gotten under my skin you ask? Because Black People do not enjoy or aspire to be blog fodder for people who have nothing to add to the advancement of Black People in North America other than opinion.

I have never considered myself a feminist, in fact, those who know me know that I am more of a Womanist than a feminist and it always grabs my attention when women who never extended an open invitation for Black Women at the table of sisterhood and solidarity suddenly jump on the bandwagon of cultural cohesion and race equality. It appears that it’s only a valid discussion when they have attention or something to garner for their interests.

Here’s my issue, we know that the feminist movement was designed to combat the oppression of females by males but; Black males haven’t systematically oppressed me and therefore I don’t see the value in misaligning myself with people who may in fact be working to oppress my brethren in the same ways that Black Women have been oppressed.
Call me old fashioned ladies but, in my version of a perfect world, I would be able to be at home every day raising, educating and supporting my children. My husband would come home to a hot meal promptly at 6pm and my full time job would be playing my traditional gender role as a wife, mother and woman of the community. Yes, people will argue that my backward thinking is foolish and obviously I have gained benefit from the feminist movement because in theory, I now have the “right” to be considered socially and politically equal to men BUT my “rights” to be considered socially and politically equal to those of white women have remained widely unchanged.
As you’ve likely deduced, my issue isn’t that the blogger came to the defense of Hip Hop and stereotypical Black High society (does this even exists other than at Snoop Lion’s house?) Many of us on the Black community have been asking some Hip Hop artists to try and be more socially responsible for a while now but that’s a whole other article! (Mostly because they have a vast platform and far reaching audience so, what better way of streaming social consciousness to young Black people?)
A public outcry of racism from a white looking Latina feminist supposedly depicted in a song is really what insults me. Black People and Black rappers aren’t one in the same. Black people are so much more than our musical contribution to globalized society. We are worth much more than a writer using us as a podium to further his or her own agenda of recognition or to advance their own status as a “freedom fighter” when they haven’t really done the work. In terms of Black People, for eurocentrism, racism, imperialism and all the “isms” to unfurl, it will be on the backs, shoulders and consciousness of Black People. It is our duty to cohesively build communal and supportive systems of our own reckoning and of our own design. In order for white supremacy to end its reign, we must first detach ourselves from the belief that it’s a valid ideology in the first place. We must abandon the thought that it’s ok for others to come to our aid and rescue as it’s not in their best interests to do that for, we outnumber them. We are not a minority.
This is not the work of a feminist, this is the work of Black Men and Black Women and Black Children to deconstruct together.

When it comes to social commentary, I’m pretty liberal but when it involves the pulling of the proverbial “race card” by a non-Black someone who appears white and I’m sure has received the privilege that comes along with that reality, I must call foul. Being overly “politically correct” on our behalf isn’t necessary. We do not need you for that. You aren’t Black so, who are you to define what Blacks define as racist? Isn’t that in itself an act of racism; Thinking that Blacks are inferior to you and cannot possibly formulate these conclusions for themselves? I’m a Black light skinned Sister, and I actually know what I’m talking about.

Light reflected is enlightenment infinite.
~Rachelle

2 Comments

Filed under Education

Eurocentric Brainwash: The Bain Of Black Existence In North America

Eurocentric Brainwash: The Bain Of Black Existence In North America.

Leave a comment

Filed under Black Educators, Black Literature, Black Youth, Brampton, Education, Literacy, Musings, Ontario, Ontario Curiculum, Parents, Women

Eurocentric Brainwash: The Bain Of Black Existence In North America

Keep Calm

As a Canadian following the US “Shutdown of non-essential Government” or the forced furlough of government employees, It’s been a rather interesting week to say the least. This article is not to get into a political discourse but, in writing about the aforementioned topic, I feel that it is of value to highlight that the resounding message to Black people living both inside and outside of the US is this: The “free world” is controlled by people who generally hate poor and middle class people and would rather see them stressed, sick, poor and dead than give them a fair and equal fighting chance for peace of mind through extending them the most basic of human essential needs, accessible and affordable healthcare.
This ought to speak volumes to Black people living in North America because although we make up an impressive spending group as a whole, we are non-essential in the realm of organized political and economic power and control.
We are marginalized because of our race, our generalized inferior social class and because of our lack of organization and solidarity as a people. Even with a Black man presiding over the “Land of The Free”, there is no symbolic resonating of a power gain or of a growing respect toward Black people. (I’m shocked that people thought that there even would be) In fact, it’s obvious that the GOP/Tea Party/Republicans or whatever they’re called this week hate their own president more than they care for average American citizens. Common sense tells me that they must generally hate all Black people and would rather see their demise at the detriment of an entire nation rather than see a Black man advance a progressive agenda for the betterment of ALL people living in the United States. Call me dramatic, it’s how I see it. Period.

When colonizing a particular group, in order to get them to secede to “new” beliefs and practices, control must first be exerted over three very important and influential branches of society: The education system, law enforcement and lastly, religious organization. Control is extended over the institutions which ultimately warp the human mind, body and spirit. Typically, I haven’t lent much “creative attention” to the ideology of white supremacy but in order to truly engage learners and reinforce that systematic racism is indeed a living and breathing thing, we know that we cannot ignore the reality of North American society and it must be consistently addressed and worked on to dispel and unfurl. For those who don’t know, white supremacy is the ideology that white people are superior to people of other racial backgrounds. White supremacy is the idea that if you are not white, then you are not right and white people naturally deserve to be dominant over you. It’s that simple. Do all white people fit into this ideology? Of course not but we aren’t concerned with that handful of people. Although we’ve been “physically free” for almost 200 years, through using systematic colonization tactics in North America, Black people are largely still in bondage of the most dangerous form; Mental slavery.

Currently, it is the schools that are majorly responsible for socializing, instilling values, moralizing and instructing Black learners. I believe that in handing near total control over to the education system, we are allowing for the systematic annihilation of our intellectual and therefore future potential. We are inviting people whose best interests it is to keep us ignorant, docile and complacent to have control and dominance over our minds. We are permitting our children to be systematically and purposefully prepared to be “larger” society’s worker ants.
Why do we do this? Because during the civil rights movements we naively and ignorantly fought to assimilate our education along with those who did not want us on their school property let alone in their classrooms. Those who never intended “formal” education be extended to us and furthermore, we put the control of our “mind building” into the hands of people who did not know anything about us and had no interest in learning or sharing any knowledge with us in the first place. We know that this was a huge mistake and now it’s time to rebound from years of mis-education and mind control.

For centuries, we have been brainwashed into believing that the natural order of humanity is the Eurocentric perspective and it’s this illusion that white supremacy is real which maintains the status quo. Living in Ontario Canada, we’re surrounded by a multitude of diversity and various ethnic groups have rightfully and responsibly taken it upon themselves to guard against this lie. The East Indian community works together to ensure that their languages, culture, heritage and various faiths are supported and maintained. The Jewish community to works together to ensure the preservation of their cultural norms, mores and values as do the Muslim, Ukrainian, Turkish, Middle Eastern, Russian and many of the other various communities. We must work cohesively to ensure that our Black children are also exposed to an alternate reality within our own respective communities now more than ever.

What factions of the US government is boldly and openly demonstrating is that the poor and subjugated deserve no voice. They deserve no benefit of communalism nor the sharing and fair distribution of resources. How long do you think it will be before Canada experiences something relatively similar? There is absolutely no guarantee that our future generations will have the security of a social safety net and therefore, it is our onus to ensure that they are prepared to be self-sufficient, useful and enterprising people. The resourceful and proactive thing to do is assume culpability for our own valuable assets as they do theirs.
Becoming aware of this reality is the first step in building a systematic approach to counter this oppressive phenomena. It’s worked hard and long enough to keep us stationary, stagnant and silent. It’s time to liberate ourselves and each other and to count ourselves as equal and deserving even when others would have us believe and behave according to the contrary popular belief.

Always –

Light reflected is enlightenment infinite.

~Rachelle

10 Comments

Filed under African Canadian, Black Canadian, Black Educators, Black Literature, Brampton, Brampton Ontario, Education, Literacy, Musings, Parents, The Back To School Chronicles